Lilongwe- In its quest to inspire and encourage girls in Malawi to continue with education, Standard Bank this week invited girl children to the Bank on October 11, 2017.

This is in addition to the girl mentorship program that the Bank is carrying out in partnership with the United Nation Children Education Fund (UNICEF), whose objective is to encourage girls continue with their education.

Standard Bank Acting Chief Executive Temwani Simwaka, said the mentoring sessions have been organised as part of International Day of the Girl Child commemoration, which falls on October 11 every year.

“In commemoration of the International Day of the Girl Child, we are inviting girl children from Standard 6 to Form 4 to spend a day with a mentor. The Bank has a deep pool of talented female employees who are experts in various fields. Through this approach, we hope our girls will be motivated to remain in school and aim high in life.” said Simwaka.

Simwaka said the registered child will spend four hours at the selected branches in Lilongwe, Blantyre and Mzuzu, and urged parents to take this opportunity by registering the girl child.

“We believe such initiatives inspire girls to work hard in class in order to realise their dreams. Since last year we have been running a Girl Mentorship program in partnership with UNICEF whose goal is to keep the girl child in school; and we believe together we will move forward and build Mother Malawi.” she said.

She noted that the Mentorship program is a major Corporate Social Investment that the bank is undertaking.

“These women leaders of the bank would like to instil a positive ‘can-do’ attitude in the girls so that they are able to break mental barriers to success,” she said.

The theme for this year’s International Day of the Girl Child is Girls’ Progress = Goals’ Progress: What Counts for Girls
Latest statistics in Malawi indicate that out of more than half of a total 4.5 million children enrolled in government primary schools, 57 percent of the girls drop out, leaving only 34 percent transitioning to secondary school and 9% fail and remain in primary school.

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