Now that Vice President Khumbo Kachali has quit PP what will his parliamentary ballot look like? Last time I checked he presented his nomination papers as a PP candidate.

Has he not disqualified himself by ‘crossing the floor’ even before the first vote is cast? Will it not be cheating to hoodwink people to vote for a PP candidate who is not a bona fide member?

Kachali is not alone in presenting themselves as candidates for parties they no longer belong to. George Nnesa of Tisintha Alliance and Chipani cha Pfuko’s Davies Katsonga lost their running mates to UDF and PP respectively. But, according to Mec, Nnesa will still appear with Sylvester Chabuka while Katsonga will still pair with Godfrey Matenganya.

What will happen if Nnesa or Katsonga win the elections? Will Malawi have a reluctant state vice president? Indeed what will happen to Kachali in Parliament? Will he be battling with Section 65 before he is even sworn in as an MP?

Our politics is fraught with impossible scenarios. For instance, we did not anticipate that presidents can quit parties that sponsored them to power and found new ones while in office. Indeed we did not foresee state vice presidents being booted out of governing parties and found their own parties and eventually making them governing parties by default.

Both DPP and PP are interesting case studies. I do not advocate amending the Constitution to answer these oftentimes selfish scenarios. Perhaps we should tighten the laws to avoid politicians from getting away with selfishness.

For example, Bingu Mutharika should have been forced to seek a fresh mandate once he quit the UDF out of his own will. PP’s situation would be rather tricky for Joyce Banda was forced out of the DPP and death eventually catapulted her to power.

We should think about these things as we take stock of the May 20 elections.

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